A Vegetarian’s Guide to Collagen and Healthy Bones

Published: July 20, 2017
Updated: June 24, 2022

Lady looking at fresh produce

What Is Collagen and Why Is it Essential for Bone Health? | 5 Health Benefits of Collagen | Collagen and Bone Health | Vegetarian Food Sources That Increase Collagen Production | 9 Nutrients That Support Collagen Production | Key Takeaways

Vegetarian collagen — is that really a thing? It seems like a paradox when you consider that food sources high in collagen come from animals, and collagen supplements are made from the bones, connective tissues, and skin of animals. 

That said, vegetable-sourced collagen supplements exist and they contain nutrients that support collagen synthesis in the body, rather than provide a direct source of collagen. In this article, you’ll discover everything you need to know about collagen and bone health, including how to get collagen from a vegetarian diet and a list of 44 vegetarian sources of collagen.

What Is Collagen and Why Is it Essential for Bone Health?

Your body contains connective tissues, which are exactly what they sound like: tissues that connect things. Fascia tissue, dermis (the bottom layer of your skin), muscles, tendons, cartilage, and the tissue surrounding your hair and nails are just a few examples.

Collagen in younger skin versus older skin

There are 28 different types of collagen, but the following four types make up 90% of the collagen in the human body2:

  • Type I: found in your connective tissue
  • Type II: found in joints and the disks in your spine
  • Type III: found in your skin and blood vessels
  • Type IV: found in your kidney, inner ear, and eye lens

Fortunately, our bodies are well-designed, and make their own collagen when consistently given the right nutrients.

Collagen, like all proteins, is made up of building blocks called amino acids, which are properly structured with the help of vitamin C. Think of amino acids like Lego pieces and vitamin C like your brilliant grandchild who can build the entire castle set with only one glance at the instructions. For this reason, it’s very important to get enough vitamin C. Now, before we get into the specifics of collagen and how it impacts bone health, it’s important to know that collagen is good for more than just our bones.

Papaya

5 Health Benefits of Collagen

While collagen is most frequently mentioned in the beauty industry, its benefits go much deeper than just our skin.

  1. Healthy Hair, Skin, and Nail Support

There is no shortage of products and procedures claiming to be the magic elixir for glowing, youthful skin, luxurious hair, and long, strong nails. Collagen showed promise in one study for improving skin elasticity in elderly women3. In others, collagen may play a role in hair growth4 and in improving the rate of skin wound healing5.

  1. Digestive Support

Stress of all kinds paired with unhealthy gut microflora can cause your digestive system to become chronically inflamed. One observational study showed that people with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) have decreased blood serum concentrations of collagen6. Supplementation of collagen and consumption of collagen from foods may help soothe, seal, and repair a damaged intestinal tract.

  1. Cardiovascular Health Benefits

The production of collagen requires vitamin C and the amino acids proline and lysine. However, so does the production of arterial plaque! If the body is using vitamin C, proline, and lysine to make collagen in the body, it decreases the amount available to create plaque. In this way, supporting healthy collagen production helps support cardiovascular health7

Collagen also gives blood vessels their elasticity; a decrease in collagen could lead to hardening of the arteries. 

  1. Collagen Boosts Metabolism

Collagen is essentially the glue that holds our tissues together. More collagen in our tissues creates a healthier structure for the tissue itself; it may also increase muscle mass. Muscle (especially skeletal muscle) burns more calories than any other tissue in the body. An increase in muscle mass increases the rate of metabolism8 to support the tissue.

  1. Collagen Supports and Improves Joint Health 

Collagen is beneficial for joints because it concentrates where they meet and where the connective tissue binds together. Oral supplementation of collagen has been found to be absorbed in the intestinal tract and incorporated into cartilage tissue in the joints. In a small study focusing on individuals with rheumatoid arthritis, collagen supplementation was found to significantly reduce swelling and pain in joints9. In fact, four of the 60 participants experienced remission of their condition during the three-month study.

Yoga stretches

Collagen and Bone Health

Your bones are made of protein and minerals, and 90% of bone matrix proteins are made of collagen. In fact, the combination of calcium and collagen is responsible for giving our bones strength and flexibility. Both collagen and calcium are responsible for the strength of your bones. And besides the obvious strength of your bones, there’s another way your bones are strong: they’re flexible. Being flexible allows the bone to bend instead of break in many instances, and to absorb an impact rather than fracture. That flexibility is thanks to collagen!

Eating foods high in lysine and arginine will help spur on collagen production. So getting both of these amino acids from your diet is a good start. Technically there is no official recommended dosage specifically for lysine or arginine, but research suggests older adults may need to consume around 1.2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight.  Read more: Learn about protein intake and how to calculate your specific needs in Everything You Need to Know About Protein and Bone Health. Lysine and arginine supplements exist, but we suggest organic whole food sources first. Your body will absorb these better, and you’ll get a whole bunch of other nutrients too So, what nutrients do our bodies need to produce proper amounts of collagen? And how can we get enough of those nutrients on a vegetarian diet?

Low collagen bone versus high collagen bone

Vegetarian Food Sources That Increase Collagen Production

First things first: Is there such a thing as vegetarian collagen? The answer is no. All collagen comes from living organisms. However, even if you don’t eat meat or animal products, you can still increase your collagen levels by eating fruits and vegetables plentiful in collagen-boosting nutrients. These nutrients support your body’s natural production of collagen. Collagen is abundant in the body and acts as the vital glue holding our bodies together. With such a vital function, the body prioritizes collagen production. Although collagen production slows as we age, it never stops. So if you supply your body with the proper nutrition to make healthy collagen, the age-related decline may not be as notable or severe.

9 Nutrients That Support Collagen Production

  • Proline: Proline and hydroxyproline10 are amino acids that make up 23% of collagen, and have been found to be precursors to sustaining collagen production. They play a key role in the stability of collagen11.

    Vegetarian proline sources: asparagus, beans, buckwheat, cabbage, chives, cucumbers, garbanzo beans, peanuts, soy, and watercress.
  • Vitamin C: Vitamin C12 adds oxygen and hydrogen to amino acids so that they can do their part in collagen production. If you don’t get enough vitamin C, your collagen production will slow.

    Vegetarian vitamin C sources: many fruits and vegetables such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, citrus fruits, kale, kiwi, mango, papaya, peppers, pineapple, and strawberries.
  • Anthocyanin: These antioxidants suppress inflammation13 and stabilize collagen (in rat studies) by preventing free radical damage and inhibiting enzymes from clinging to collagen.

    Vegetarian anthocyanin sources: blackberries, blueberries, cherries, and raspberries.
  • Copper: Copper14 increases the production or utilization of collagen and elastin; it also helps facilitate the fibril structure of these collagens.

    Vegetarian copper sources: sunflower seeds, lentils, almonds, apricots, dark chocolate, mushrooms, greens, and blackstrap molasses.
  • Lysine: Used in making collagen and protecting it from enzymatic breakdown, lysine also increases intestinal calcium absorption15.

    Vegetarian lysine sources: eggs, dairy products (particularly parmesan cheese), tofu, brewer’s yeast, and spirulina.
  • (L-)Arginine: Research suggests that arginine stimulates insulin-like-growth factor-l16(IGF-1) production and collagen synthesis in osteoblast-like cells. Basically, arginine makes the cells responsible for making new bone (osteoblasts) more active.

    Vegetarian arginine sources: eggs, sesame seeds, spirulina, coconut meat, cultured yogurt, kefir, and raw cheeses.
  • Vitamin A: Vitamin A helps stimulate the production of collagen17 and is only found in animal-derived foods (in its complete, active form called retinol). Fruits and veggies are high in phytonutrients called carotenoids (precursors of vitamin A), which the body must then convert to vitamin A.

    Vegetarian sources that are high in beta-carotene, which your body must then convert to vitamin A to use: apricots, broccoli, carrots, kale, squash, and sweet potatoes.
  • Manganese: Manganese increases production of collagen18 and elastin by increasing the enzyme responsible for proline formation, especially when healing wounds.

    Vegetarian sources of manganese: leafy vegetables, nuts, pineapple, seaweed and other sea vegetables, and whole grains.

Zinc: Zinc is a cofactor in collagen production19, meaning it activates the proteins responsible for making collagen. The richest source of zinc is oysters, but other zinc-rich foods are meat, poultry, fish and dairy products.

Vegetarian zinc sources: seeds, nuts, and beans.

Kale

Key Takeaways

When it comes to collagen and bone health, the two big takeaways include:

  1. Collagen is essential to bone health (and so much more!) 
  1. Your body produces collagen naturally, and will produce more if you eat foods rich in the nutrients listed in the chart above. You don’t need to eat meat or take a collagen peptide supplement to maintain proper levels of collagen.

Do you follow a vegetarian or vegan diet? Feel free to share your thoughts and your favorite collagen-promoting food sources in the comments below.

References

1. Diegelman R. Analysis of Collagen Synthesis. Wound Healing. 2003. Vol. 78 ISBN : 978-0-89603-999-5

2. Wu M, Cronin K, Cran J. Biochemistry, Collagen Synthesis. StatPearls Publishing. 2021

3. Proksch E, Segger D, Degwert J, et al. Oral supplementation of specific collagen peptides has beneficial effects on human skin physiology: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Skin Pharmacol Physiol. 2014;27(1):47-55. doi: 10.1159/000351376. Epub 2013 Aug 14. PMID: 23949208.

4. Tobin D, Magerl M, Gunin A, et al. Plasticity and Cytokinetic Dynamics of the Hair Follicle Mesenchyme: Implications for Hair Growth Control. Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Vol 120, 6, June 2003:895-904

5. Nystrom A, Velati D, Mittapalli V, et al. Collagen VII plays a dual role in wound healing. The Journal of Clinical Investigation. July 2013

6. Koutroubakis E, Petinaki E, Dimoulios P, et al. Serum laminin and collagen IV in inflammatory bowel disease. Journal of Clinical Pathology. 2003 Nov;56(11):817-20

7. https://nutritionreview.org/2013/04/collagen-connection/

8. Tipton KD, Wolfe RR. Exercise, protein metabolism, and muscle growth. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2001 Mar;11(1):109-32. doi: 10.1123/ijsnem.11.1.109. PMID: 11255140.

9. Trentham DE, Dynesius-Trentham RA, Orav EJ, Combitchi D, Lorenzo C, Sewell KL, Hafler DA, Weiner HL. Effects of oral administration of type II collagen on rheumatoid arthritis. Science. 1993 Sep 24;261(5129):1727-30. doi: 10.1126/science.8378772. PMID: 8378772.

10. Barbul A. Proline precursors to sustain Mammalian collagen synthesis. J Nutr. 2008 Oct;138(10):2021S-2024S. doi: 10.1093/jn/138.10.2021S. PMID: 18806118.

11. https://hmdb.ca/metabolites/HMDB0000725

12. https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/health-disease/skin-health/vitamin-C

13. Jill M Tall, Navindra P Seeram, Chengshui Zhao, Muraleedharan G Nair, Richard A Meyer, Srinivasa N Raja. “Tart cherry anthocyanins suppress inflammation-induced pain behavior in rat”, Behavioural Brain Research, Volume 153, Issue 1,

2004, Pages 181-188

14. Borkow G. Using Copper to Improve the Well-Being of the Skin. Curr Chem Biol. 2014;8(2):89-102. doi:10.2174/2212796809666150227223857

15. Civitelli R, Villareal DT, Agnusdei D, Nardi P, Avioli LV, Gennari C. Dietary L-lysine and calcium metabolism in humans. Nutrition. 1992 Nov-Dec;8(6):400-5. PMID: 1486246.

16. Chevalley T, Rizzoli R, Manen D, Caverzasio J, Bonjour JP. Arginine increases insulin-like growth factor-I production and collagen synthesis in osteoblast-like cells. Bone. 1998 Aug;23(2):103-9. doi: 10.1016/s8756-3282(98)00081-7. PMID: 9701468.

17. Varani J, Warner RL, Gharaee-Kermani M, Phan SH, Kang S, Chung JH, Wang ZQ, Datta SC, Fisher GJ, Voorhees JJ. Vitamin A antagonizes decreased cell growth and elevated collagen-degrading matrix metalloproteinases and stimulates collagen accumulation in naturally aged human skin. J Invest Dermatol. 2000 Mar;114(3):480-6. doi: 10.1046/j.1523-1747.2000.00902.x. PMID: 10692106.

18. https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/minerals/manganese

19. https://healthyeating.sfgate.com/minerals-aid-collagen-production-9485.html

Article Comments

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  1. misty

    June 6, 2017 , 12:01 pm

    Vegetarian here! My favorite protein source are local-sourced eggs. I eat at least one a day, but usually shoot for two. Lately I feel like I may be deficient in protein, so I’ve started eating Sacha Inchi seeds daily (8.5 grams per handful serving + lots of good omega 3s).
    Love this info above, thanks for sharing!

  2. Monica

    June 7, 2017 , 8:23 am

    Hi Misty,
    Awesome! Thanks so much for sharing your go-to choices for protein. I’m not too familiar with Sacha Inchi seeds, but will definitely look into them now!

    – Monica

  3. Karl

    July 12, 2017 , 7:23 pm

    misty said:

    “Lately I feel like I may be deficient in protein, so I’ve started eating Sacha Inchi seeds daily.”

    Nonsense. You’re not protein deficient.

  4. Paulette

    July 22, 2017 , 6:55 am

    If I am taking strontium boost and algaecalplus plus and omega what else do I need for collagen and do I have to take strontium at night

  5. Monica

    July 23, 2017 , 8:57 am

    Hi Paulette,

    You don’t have to take your Strontium Boost at night. However, you do need to take it 2-3 hours apart from any calcium-containing foods. We have listed an extensive food list in the post itself, but you can also supplement with collagen. Collagen can be found online or at your nearest health food store.
    – Monica @ AlgaeCal

  6. Gabrielle Hochberg

    July 22, 2017 , 10:42 am

    Great article! What do you think about taking silicon with stabilized Choline orthosilica acid vitamins to help build college and elastin?

  7. Monica

    July 24, 2017 , 8:23 am

    Hi Gabrielle,

    Silicon has many positive effects on bone – and studies show that Choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid supplementation may be beneficial for osteoporosis. As it shows a potential beneficial effect on bone collagen https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2442067/.

    If this sounds like something you’re interested in adding to your health regimen, it is best to discuss with your doctor as well.

    – Monica @ AlgaeCal

  8. Katie

    July 22, 2017 , 11:10 am

    Liked the topic in the article, but I’m confused on some of the information you provided.
    In bold letters you say arginine and lysine are important for bone metabolism and growth.
    The food chart lists the same foods for both amino acids but different nutrient amounts, it’s like the wrong foods were listed for one of them.
    I then read the more detailed information you wrote on each amino acid and there was only one food, tofu, that was also shown in the food chart. The other food sources mentioned were not listed in the food chart.
    Can you please clarify the discrepancy?
    Thank you.

  9. Monica

    July 23, 2017 , 9:10 am

    Hi Katie,

    In the chart, we list the same foods for lysine and arginine. Those foods have different amounts of arginine and lysine.

    For example, Tofu has 450 mg of lysine and 1250 mg of arginine in 100 g of tofu. There are foods shown in the chart that aren’t in the paragraphs below in detail, that’s correct. We wanted to name additional foods not in the table that were also sources.

    Hope that helps to clarify!

    – Monica @ AlgaeCal

  10. a Vegetarian

    July 22, 2017 , 4:25 pm

    Gelatin, Dry Powder – usually NOT vegetarian. If it is, can you please tell us the name brand that is and where to buy it? Thank you.

  11. Monica

    July 24, 2017 , 8:41 am

    Great point – there are vegetarian alternatives like agar agar, pectin, vegan gel powder and carrageenan that you can use in place of gelatin for baking, cooking etc. Although these aren’t from proteins (as they don’t contain amino acids) and won’t promote collagen production.

    You should be able to find gelatin alternative options at your nearest health food store.

    – Monica @ AlgaeCal

  12. Courtney

    August 22, 2017 , 6:41 am

    I am vegan, some tell me there is a plant based collagen I can take in place of regular collagen, is this true? If so, any idea what it is?

  13. Monica

    August 22, 2017 , 8:15 am

    Hi Courtney,

    I’ve seen some brands of plant based collagen that contain key co-nutrients like silica (from plant sources), which promotes collagen production. I’d recommend searching “vegan collagen supplement” or “plant based collagen supplement” and see what comes up. I haven’t personally used any of these types so can’t attest to the quality.

    If you do find a great one, please share!

    – Monica @ AlgaeCal

  14. Nancy Blum

    July 2, 2019 , 6:04 pm

    AlgaeCal contains silicon, a building block for collagen. To get even more silicon, I’ve heard that BioSil is a great product, and it is vegetarian. If you ingest enough protein and the nutrients listed above (especially vitamin C, also in AlgaCal), your body would generate enough collagen.

  15. met

    August 20, 2020 , 10:34 am

    i could not see glycine aminoacid.

  16. Ilene Ungerleider

    June 26, 2022 , 6:36 am

    I’ve been taking the vegan collagen booster from Future Kind. They are a lovely company.

  17. Suzanne Stoeckle

    October 21, 2017 , 2:27 pm

    If you want a vegan / vegetarian protein – consider Quinoa & potatoes not Chia seeds. Although they have a good amino acid profile …… see this study: very poor digestability. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267834776_Protein_digestibility_of_chia_seed_Salvia_hispanica_L: ” When soaked seeds were analyzed, a low value was obtained (24.30% of digestibility), we were expecting a highest value. It have been reported that acidic environments like employed in soaked treatment (pH 3.0) increase digestibility susceptibility, like in artichoke products where pH 4.0 induce increase in this parameter (40). But, hydration of soluble fiber induces a gel formation, which might affect in an adverse fashion enzymatic activity which in this case might be observed in low digestibility activity (41). As well Quinoa offers an amazing mineral and anitoxidant profile. Chia is great for its oil profile however.

  18. Cindy

    March 10, 2018 , 8:29 am

    You are missing hemp seeds, and hemp oil.

  19. Cammie Noel

    June 3, 2018 , 9:58 am

    Hi. I am going to order some algea cal ASAP.I have trouble with too much argenine as I get cold sores.Being a vegan this is hard.I need to know exactly how much argenine is in Algea cal plus.I called and the representative said none.I am sure she is wrong.Can you please ASAP tell me how much is in it? Thank you

  20. Monica AlgaeCal

    June 4, 2018 , 8:48 am

    Hi Cammie Noel,

    The Bone Health Consultant you spoke to is correct, while AlgaeCal Plus is a natural calcium supplement with additional vitamins and trace minerals — arginine is not one of them.

    If you have any further questions, please let us know!

    – Monica

  21. Cammie Noel

    June 3, 2018 , 10:00 am

    How much argenine exactly is in the Algea Cal plus with strontium boost? I need to know this before I order.

  22. Sharon

    June 26, 2018 , 10:33 am

    Hi, this is a mixed topic and I love that you posted the food sources to keep up the production. I see that the majority of employees are young and full of vibrant collagen. The question for us baby boomers is how to keep it going in your 70’s. I eat all of the good stuff but I quit doing tofu and frankly I have been so confused with what to eat. My husband is a meat eater and I don’t do well, but I need a bioavailable source of protein. Like many of the people here I am a vegetarian. So when I called and talked to one of your staff they said the organic red sea algae does not have vitamins, so what does it do? Thanks I would love to hear from you.

  23. Jenna AlgaeCal

    July 2, 2018 , 2:03 pm

    Hi Sharon,

    We definitely understand – it can be tough to figure out the right foods to eat! For a little inspiration in the kitchen, visit our blog for lots of nutritious recipes here 🙂

    Sharon, we’re glad to see you’ve connected with our Bone Health Consultants via email about these questions! To clarify, our raw algae is naturally rich in bone supporting minerals. And to make the most complete bone-building supplement, we’ve added vitamins C, D3, and K2 into our AlgaeCal Plus formulation!

    Hope that helps!

    – Jenna @ AlgaeCal

  24. Garance

    July 20, 2018 , 7:22 pm

    Synergy of grouped foods is critical too. A lot of people dont appreciate how much a well balanced and properly cooked recipe is actually healthy as well as good tasting. Other things like always using a pressure cooker to cook legumes. Its an 8000 hr apprenticeship to learn ‘foods for health’ in the west though in India its often common knowledge.

  25. Joy

    July 24, 2018 , 6:32 am

    I’m a vegan yet my chiropractor told me to take collagen peptides (bovine)in water in the morning before I eat. I’ve been doing some research and I see that the gut produces TAMO, trimethylamine n-oxide, from the collagen, which is part of cancer production. I’m 72 and I take collagen for my skin and joints -is there a vegan powder that is nonbovine collagen and peptides that I can take? Lately my stomach bacteria is telling me that it’s upset with what I’m taking. Thanks for any help you can give me.

  26. Jenna AlgaeCal

    July 31, 2018 , 2:33 pm

    Hi Joy,

    Awesome to hear you’re doing your research! One option we found is the Organic Plant Collagen Builder by Garden of Life. You can see it here.

    We hope that’s helpful in your search 🙂

    – Jenna @ AlgaeCal

  27. Liselle

    January 1, 2020 , 5:20 pm

    If one uses a good vegan protein powder every day and eats plenty of fruits, is it useful to add some Collagen Builder, as well, as in the one you recommended above?

  28. Blaire AlgaeCal

    January 2, 2020 , 11:08 am

    Good question, Liselle! You can add collagen to your supplement routine if needed ? Of course, it’s always a good idea to compare your additional supplements with it and determine what may be reduced or eliminated. We also recommend speaking with a doctor before starting any new supplement regimen ❤️

    – Blaire @ AlgaeCal

  29. Loretta

    July 26, 2018 , 12:21 pm

    I was diagnosed with ER/PR+HER2- breast cancer in the fall of 2014. I have treated all naturally. Not related to the diagnosis (I think more to do with age) some pain that comes and goes and I believe it’s due to bone loss. I am on no pharma at all. I am on strictly natural supplements, etc. Insofar as ER+ BC is concerned, there are no contra-indications? I have no other health issues. I’m 53. Thank you!

  30. Jenna AlgaeCal

    August 10, 2018 , 9:55 am

    Hi Loretta,

    Thanks for taking the time to reach out! I asked Lara Pizzorno, Bone Health Expert and author of Your Bones, for her best recommendation specific to your situation. She confirmed that the nutrients in AlgaeCal Plus, Strontium Boost, and Triple Power Fish Oil will not cause harm and should be protective against breast cancer as well as bone loss.

    I’ll send you an email shortly with her full response and the research behind this!

    – Jenna @ AlgaeCal

  31. Nanita

    May 20, 2020 , 8:59 pm

    hi can you also send me the full response email for the research behind the AlgaeCal Plus, Strontium Boost, and Triple Power Fish Oil will not cause harm and should be protective against breast cancer as well as bone loss, from Lara Pizzorno as well? I am interested in learning more about the research please thank you for your time~

  32. Megan AlgaeCal

    May 22, 2020 , 10:13 am

    Hi Nanita!

    We’ve forwarded the email to you 🙂

    -Megan @ AlgaeCal

  33. Ann Franzino

    August 30, 2018 , 7:50 am

    My son has Scleroderma which is an over-production of collagen.
    Is there a preferred diet for this condition?

  34. Jenna AlgaeCal

    September 12, 2018 , 10:48 am

    We’re sorry to hear of your son’s scleroderma, Ann.

    AlgaeCal is a bone-health company – we’re sorry to say this condition is outside of our area of expertise. You may wish to discuss your concerns with his medical practitioner, or with a trusted nutritionist or naturopath.

    We wish you and your son every success in finding the right diet for his needs.

    – Jenna @ AlgaeCal

  35. stelioscdn

    August 31, 2018 , 9:40 pm

    Hi Monica,
    I like the (excellent) way you introduse the facts into collagen article.
    Keep up the good work.

    S. Georgakakis
    Toronto Canada

  36. Jessi

    May 7, 2019 , 9:09 am

    I’m looking for a vegan collagen supplement or powder to take ,is there one you can suggest?

  37. Jenna AlgaeCal

    May 14, 2019 , 10:19 am

    Hi Jessi,

    We don’t have a specific product recommendation, however, another reader may have one they can share! Otherwise, your local health food store should be able to recommend a high-quality vegan collagen supplement to you.

    – Jenna @ AlgaeCal

  38. Arun Jain

    May 9, 2019 , 7:39 pm

    My doctor has prescribed me collagen peptides granules. Internet search revealed that this is obtained from cow hides. I am a strict vegetarian. Is there any vegetarian substitute to collagen peptides granules or any food that would give me these?

  39. Angela Dill

    August 23, 2019 , 5:16 pm

    I’m going t have a Bone Density Test, is it dangerous? Can it cause some damages to the body? I’m 82 years old, never broke a bone in my life. But have in the knees osteoarthritis for some time with some swelling too. About a week ago started to take “complete Collagen” . It will take some time to see any results? Thank you.

  40. Blaire AlgaeCal

    August 27, 2019 , 11:18 am

    Hi Angela,

    It’s great to hear you will be having a bone density test soon – please do keep us updated! Bone density tests are safe; however, it is best to limit them to once a year or so. You can learn more about bone density tests here.

    We’re so sorry to hear about your osteoarthritis. You might be interested in trying our Triple Power Fish Oil, which helps fight inflammation.

    Any questions, don’t hesitate!

    – Blaire @ AlgaeCal

  41. Blaire AlgaeCal

    August 27, 2019 , 11:09 am

    Hi Arun,

    We recommend checking out your local health food store for a high-quality vegetarian collagen supplement. One of the best ways to support collagen production through vegetarian foods is to eat foods high in nutrients known to boost collagen – such as swiss cheese, broccoli, eggplant, dried prunes, black beans, and sweet potatoes.

    Hope that helps! Let us know if you have any further questions ?

    – Blaire @ AlgaeCal

  42. Clark Kent

    December 14, 2019 , 7:47 am

    I have heard that vegan collagen products contain genetically modified ingredients if so is this a health risk?

  43. Blaire AlgaeCal

    December 16, 2019 , 12:11 pm

    Hi Clark,

    You’re right – some vegan collagen products do contain GMO ingredients. It is best to avoid GMO ingredients, so please do look for a high-quality vegetarian supplement! If unsure, you can always ask your local health food store to point you in the direction of a non-GMO vegetarian collagen supplement ?

    – Blaire @ AlgaeCal

  44. Janis

    December 19, 2019 , 2:13 pm

    And does yours?

  45. Blaire AlgaeCal

    December 20, 2019 , 12:08 pm

    Good question, Janis. While AlgaeCal does not contain collagen, it does contain vitamin C, which stimulates collagen production! And not to worry, AlgaeCal Plus is non-GMO 😀

    – Blaire @ AlgaeCal

  46. Ana Mirkovic

    January 20, 2020 , 12:29 am

    I take L-lysine to prevent geting cold sores.
    It works.
    Can be taken in capsules or powder form.

  47. Megan AlgaeCal

    January 21, 2020 , 8:39 am

    Thanks for the tip, Ana! ?

    -Megan @ AlgaeCal

  48. Ess

    January 23, 2020 , 11:06 am

    Very informative article on Collagen typies, its interface w. bone production and the various sources….

    My Q. though concerns algae and other sea-plant products (e.g. seaweed, kelp, etc.) being used in many supplements SINCE the Fukoshima tragedy. Since water is one the world over (& lets mot forget the then reporting of high radiation levels showing up on the shores of the whole Pacific at least (CA and OR among them).
    Sooooo…it’s hard to identify any of these sea plant foods and/or supplement products as safe (given radioactivity breakdown takes ‘forever’). But, shelves are STILL stocked w. such products (I stopped ingesting any of them since that unfortunate world crisis in Japan– a friend was lucky– she had a stockpile of PRE-Fukoshima seaweeds, etc).
    Soooo, WHAT of them IS safe to eat, IF any???
    I’ve not seen much discussed at all about this concern.
    Thank you for weighing in on this topic….

  49. Blaire AlgaeCal

    January 24, 2020 , 11:25 am

    Thanks for reaching out to us, Ess! We’re glad you found the article informative ?

    AlgaeCal is made from the coralline algae, Algas Calcareas, which only exists in certain areas of South America, on the Atlantic ocean. Your concern about radiation in the ocean stems from the incident in Japan, in the Pacific ocean. Although we do not specifically test for radiation, AlgaeCal is USDA/EU/IFOAM certified organic and free of pollutants. In order to obtain this certificate the product must annually meet very strict requirements and standards regarding contaminants and sustainability. Please be assured that every single batch of AlgaeCal produced is tested by AlgaeCal and independently by a third party laboratory to ensure our high quality standard.

    Hope this helps ease your concerns! Let us know if you have any further questions ❤️

    – Blaire @ AlgaeCal

  50. Donna

    December 27, 2020 , 9:57 am

    Why don’t you test for the radiation?

  51. Alicia Menon

    June 22, 2020 , 6:58 pm

    I take bone drug injections every 6 months. Would taking collagen supplements interfere with the effectiveness of these injections?

  52. Blaire AlgaeCal

    June 23, 2020 , 3:17 pm

    Hi Alicia,

    Thank you for reaching out! We recommend discussing any supplement or medication interactions with your pharmacist – he/she will be able to provide you with the best insight in regards to this matter ❤️

    – Blaire @ AlgaeCal

  53. raj

    October 20, 2020 , 6:49 am

    I really like Algaecal daily workout plan. If I followed that exercise plan is it enough for daily workout. Is it ok If I do exercise every day and go for walk for 30 minutes.
    It would be nice if we can get daily meal plan. so I just get roughly idea what to eat and how much, Plus can we eat bread every day? what bread is good to eat.

    Thank you,
    Raj

  54. Megan AlgaeCal

    October 20, 2020 , 12:15 pm

    Hi Raj, so happy to hear that you’re enjoying the daily workout plan!

    Yes, combining this workout plan with walking for 30 minutes each day sounds like a great way to get in both your aerobic and resistance exercises.

    While we currently don’t have a meal plan, we do offer many bone-healthy recipes on our blog here. You can also subscribe to our blog to gain access to our 32 Recipes for Stronger Bones eBook. ❤️

    -Megan @ AlgaeCal

  55. Mary

    August 6, 2021 , 2:52 pm

    Have a problem with collagen in powder form. I can taste it and want to know about capsules. Would I benefit as much as using the powder? Thank-you!

  56. Blaire AlgaeCal

    August 10, 2021 , 1:41 pm

    Thanks for reaching out, Mary!

    We don’t have a specific product recommendation; however, another reader may have one they can share! Otherwise, your local health food store should be able to recommend a high-quality collagen supplement to you.

    – Blaire @ AlgaeCal

  57. Mary Greene

    December 29, 2021 , 9:40 am

    Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (non gmo) brewers yeast has a magnificent amino acid profile . It is great for vegetarians as well and contains many other nutrients. It contains telomerase. It would be hard to beat as the ultimate longevity food.

  58. Luisa

    March 6, 2022 , 11:42 pm

    build a new bones means , our bones get bigger and we gain more weight and we can see it physically we grow more .which is an ugly thing to happen while we are trying to lose weight?

  59. Kirby Johnson

    March 7, 2022 , 1:50 pm

    Luisa,

    We absolutely understand your concern; you bring up a great question! Increasing bone mineral density (BMD) improves the overall health of our skeletal system by building new bone which we naturally lose at a rate of approximately 1% each year after the age of 40. You’ll be happy to hear that BMD is positively associated with body weight rather than contributing negatively to weight gain. This study found no independent association between weight gain and forearm BMD. You can learn more about weight loss and bone health HERE. If you have further questions about building new bone, please don’t hesitate to connect with our knowledgeable Bone Health Consultants at 1-800-820-0184 (USA & Canada toll-free). Hope this helps!

    – Kirby @ AlgaeCal

  60. Patti

    June 25, 2022 , 1:41 pm

    Fantastic information! Thank you so much! It’s refreshing to get great information and I’m not having it sell me something! I love algae Cal! I

  61. Kirby Johnson

    June 28, 2022 , 5:35 pm

    Patti,

    We’re absolutely thrilled that you’ve been enjoying our content – thank you so much for your kind words 🙂 Please don’t ever hesitate to reach out if you should have any questions along your bone-health journey!

    – Kirby @ AlgaeCal

  62. Gloria Scalise

    June 25, 2022 , 5:14 pm

    Is there a collagen supplement that Algae Cal recommends?

  63. Kirby Johnson

    June 28, 2022 , 2:25 pm

    Gloria,

    Thank you so much for taking the time to read through our content 🙂 With the vast number of high-quality collagen supplements available, we don’t have any particular supplement we’d recommend above others. We’d encourage you to discuss your bone-health goals with your doctor in order to find the right fit for you!

    – Kirby @ AlgaeCal

  64. Ishka McNulty

    June 25, 2022 , 6:50 pm

    Thank you for this article. I needed this information as I’m vegetarian not vegan. However I did take a collegen supplement for a month or so and noticed that my skin and nails were much better. My skin is basically ok but as I’m 79 not it is starting to show a few more wrinkles than it used to (haha). My dies includes many of the items recommended for nutritional intake to increase the production of collagen But obviously It seems I need to include more things more often. Are any of these things in the algecal capsules? calcium of course but what else?

  65. Ilene Ungerleider

    June 26, 2022 , 6:34 am

    I am a vegan and am very interested in how to get collagen into my diet. I eat a wide variety of food, but wonder if there is a vegan collagen supplement that you recommend.

  66. Kirby Johnson

    June 28, 2022 , 2:24 pm

    Ilene,

    It’s absolutely wonderful to hear you’ve been prioritizing your bone health through whole foods <3 While there are likely a number of vegan collagen supplements available, we don't have any particular supplement we'd recommend above others; your doctor may have a specific recommendation that would be a good fit for you!

    - Kirby @ AlgaeCal

This article features advice from our industry experts to give you the best possible info through cutting-edge research.

Prof. Didier Hans
PHD, MBA - Head of Research & Development Center of Bone Diseases, Lausanne University Hospital CHUV, Switzerland,
Lara Pizzorno
MDiv, MA, LMT - Best-selling author of Healthy Bones Healthy You! and Your Bones; Editor of Longevity Medicine Review, and Senior Medical Editor for Integrative Medicine Advisors.,
Dr. Liz Lipski
PhD, CNS, FACN, IFMP, BCHN, LDN - Professor and Director of Academic Development, Nutrition programs in Clinical Nutrition at Maryland University of Integrative Health.,
Dr. Loren Fishman
MD, PhD - Medical Director of Manhattan Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Founder of the Yoga Injury Prevention Website.,
Dr. Carole McArthur
MD, PhD - Professor of Immunology, Univ. of Missouri-Kansas City; Director of Residency Research in Pathology, Truman Medical Center.,