Truffled Parsnip Puree: The Perfect, Make-Ahead Side Dish for the Holidays

Updated: December 9, 2022

Few things spread holiday cheer like a festive soiree that brings loved ones together to dine on delicious, foodie must-haves. Welcoming people into your home is a great way to show you care.

But, it doesn’t have to be a hassle for you. With this easy, bone-healthy, make-ahead side dish, you can take the “get it all done on the big day” stress out of the equation.

Oh, and be forewarned, our truffled parsnip puree recipe is a game changer. It’s so tasty it’ll have your guests asking, “So when can we come back — seriously, when?”

But this parsnip puree isn’t just heaven for the palate, it’s a treat for your bones too. You see, in addition to being naturally sweet, parsnips contain the powerful antioxidant vitamin C. Plus, they pack a healthy dose of fiber, vitamin K, and folate.

This side dish has it all and then some. It’s easy, delicious, bone-healthy and only takes a handful of ingredients to make — which makes it perfect for the holidays!

Truffled Parsnip Puree

Truffled Parsnip Puree Recipe

Note: If you have guests with special dietary restrictions, you’ll be pleased to know this gluten free, grain free, vegetarian parsnip puree has them covered too! Remember, butter and milk can also be easily replaced with plant-based products for those with dairy allergies.
Prep Time 20 mins
Cook Time 15 mins
Total Time 35 mins
Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Servings 4
Calories 147 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 1.5 lb parsnips [or 6 large]
  • 1 tbsp grass fed butter
  • ¼ cup organic low-fat milk
  • ¼ cup water
  • 1 tbsp truffle infused olive oil
  • Salt to taste

Instructions
 

  • Peel and chop parsnips into small even sized pieces for steaming.
  • Place ½" of water in the bottom of a saucepan with parsnips. Cover with a lid and steam on medium low heat until parsnips are soft (approximately 10 minutes).
  • Drain any remaining water and place them in a blender. Add milk, water, butter, and truffle oil. Blend until smooth. The puree should just stick to your spoon.
  • Place parsnip in a serving dish, drizzle with 1 tbsp truffle oil, and serve!

Nutrition

Calories: 147kcalCarbohydrates: 21gProtein: 2gFat: 7gCholesterol: 8mgSodium: 40mgPotassium: 450mgFiber: 6gSugar: 6gVitamin A: 116IUVitamin C: 19mgCalcium: 60mgIron: 1mg
Keyword gluten-free, grain free, vegetarian
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

How to Make a Healthy Parsnip Puree

This delectable, buttery smooth truffled parsnip puree can be made days in advance to help reduce holiday stress. So give yourself a break and prepare and store this dish ahead of time.

When the big day comes, unveil and voilà! You’ll have one of those simple, comfort food sides that’s bound to delight grown-ups as much as picky kids.

And the best part? You can spend less time in the kitchen and more time with your family. After all, the best way to make the holidays sparkle is to spend quality time with those you love.

Truffled Parsnip Puree

Health Benefits of Parsnips

Parsnips are the main star of this holiday recipe and they are loaded with vitamin C. And vitamin C is vital to the development of your collagen. Since more than 90% of the protein in bone is made from your collagen, vitamin C is an essential nutrient for healthy bones.1

Vitamin C also stimulates the production of your mesenchymal stem cells (MSMs). MSMs are produced in your bone marrow and can develop into different types of cells, including cartilage, muscle, and fat cells, as well as bone-building osteoblasts.

Moreover, parsnips are packed with fiber. And getting an adequate amount of fiber will support optimal digestion. In turn, this will help you absorb nutrients, such as calcium, from your food — which can help reduce your risk of losing bone mass.

Discover More Delicious, Bone-Healthy Holiday Recipes

Now as amazing as this truffled parsnip puree is, it’s not designed to fly solo. It’s the cool side kick that supports the main character, our mouthwatering hearty prime rib roast.

You just can’t have one without the other — dynamic duos aren’t meant to be separated. Can you imagine Lucy without Ethel or Carrie without Samantha? Unthinkable.

So keep these besties together. And if you really want to wow your guests, hit them with this crazy good sweet potato cheesecake parfait.

All our holiday recipes are loaded with antioxidants, protein, vitamins, and minerals. So your bones will love it as much as your taste buds.

I’d love to hear what you think about the recipe. So don’t forget to leave a comment and let me know how you enjoyed it!

To learn more about healthy aging and bone health, sign up for our newsletter and receive weekly updates and more tasty, bone-healthy recipes.


References

  1. Shivani Sahni, Marian T. Hannan, David Gagnon, Jeffrey Blumberg, L. Adrienne Cupples, Douglas P. Kiel, and Katherine L. Tucker, “Protective effect of total and supplemental vitamin C intake on the risk of hip fracture – A 17-year follow-up from the Framingham Osteoporosis Study,” Osteoporos Int. 2009 November; 20(11): 1853–1861. doi:10.1007/s00198-009-0897-y

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This article features advice from our industry experts to give you the best possible info through cutting-edge research.

Prof. Didier Hans
PHD, MBA - Head of Research & Development Center of Bone Diseases, Lausanne University Hospital CHUV, Switzerland,
Lara Pizzorno
MDiv, MA, LMT - Best-selling author of Healthy Bones Healthy You! and Your Bones; Editor of Longevity Medicine Review, and Senior Medical Editor for Integrative Medicine Advisors.,
Dr. Liz Lipski
PhD, CNS, FACN, IFMP, BCHN, LDN - Professor and Director of Academic Development, Nutrition programs in Clinical Nutrition at Maryland University of Integrative Health.,
Dr. Loren Fishman
MD, B.Phil.,(oxon.) - Medical Director of Manhattan Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Founder of the Yoga Injury Prevention Website.,
Dr. Carole McArthur
MD, PhD - Professor of Immunology, Univ. of Missouri-Kansas City; Director of Residency Research in Pathology, Truman Medical Center.,